Instagram

Content without action, what is it?

We all get caught up in the social media buzz for business to be in front of your audience, to produce quality content, to be consistent, grow your brand, right? And it’s all good, all true, but with all that focus on content and exposure and engagement, it can be easy to lose sight of the next step. Not your next step, your customers’ next step.

That next step is all about the ‘call to action’. In other words, what do you want them to do next? Now that they’ve seen that awesome graphic, read that excellent caption, liked and shared that brilliant blog post … now what?

Here’s the thing; the people that like what you’re doing, have taken the time to follow you and read what you’ve written, have clicked ‘Like’ or double-tapped to show their support, they’re often ready and primed to do more. They just need you to tell them what that ‘more’ is.

Sometimes it’s a call to action (‘CTA’, in case you’ve read that elsewhere and wondered what it stood for ;) that addresses interest that’s early on in the piece and therefore asks for a super-simple action. On Instagram, ‘Double-tap if you like this’, or ‘agree with this’, or on Facebook, ‘Hit Like if you agree’, or ‘How about sharing this with your friends if you think they’d agree’.

It sounds so incredibly simple that we could easily dismiss this, right? But don’t mistake simplicity for ineffective. I admittedly sometimes underrate the worth of this wisdom too, and yet when I’m scrolling through my feeds and I see a request for me to ‘Double-tap if you agree’, or something similar, I always feel compelled to do so … IF I agree. And often, when I see this request on posts I would ‘double-tap’ or ‘Like’ anyway, funnily enough, I feel compelled to then embellish that ‘like’ with a comment. Am I alone here? I don’t think so.

Then there are calls to action that address interest that’s further along and ask for a little more commitment, not much though. Something like, ‘Comment below’, and sharing with friends can take a moment more than simply ‘liking’, but if people are finding value in what you’re doing, then it’s really no big deal.

The thing about asking for comments and shares as your calls to action is that people like to be helpful and they like to share the knowledge they have as a way of being useful to others. It’s a fundamentally human trait and one of the basic reasons that social media has embedded itself so quickly in our lives. We like to help others and we like to use our knowledge to help others, so commenting and sharing facilitates this need pretty easily and pretty intuitively. Oh and you get engagement and exposure. Win - win.

More complicated calls to action meet our audience further down the line, where they’re ready to take more action and commit further. Therefore, these actions require more structure and planning on our behalf. Calls such as ‘Sign up to our newsletter’, or ‘Learn more’, or ‘Get your free …’ obviously require some additional set-up on our side so that our customers’ impetus goes somewhere. But I’m sure you can see that this how your content really becomes a tool for lead generation and sales in your business, and much more than a ‘nice to have’.

Content is lovely, content is enjoyable and engaging, but to make it worth the effort, make sure you tell your audience what you want them to do next. Social media is just a hobby unless it’s driving business objectives, so make sure your content is contributing to meeting those objectives by simply asking your audience to do what you want them to do next.

And here’s my call to action for you ... If you’ve read this blog post and you thought it contained some small value, how about commenting below to let me know you were here? And if you’re super-keen, would you mind sharing it with a friend? Plus, if you want a hand with setting up the other bits so you can call your audience to even more action, email me at andrea@pepperstreetsocial.com, or contact me via the form on my Work page … or just hit one of the social icons and connect with me that way.

 

Thanks for reading,

Andrea

 

 

 

What's the go with #hashtags?

Feeling a bit ‘in-the-dark’ about hashtags? Ever tried to tag someone using a hashtag and wondered why they never responded? Have you been adding the # to random words just because you think you ‘should’ be using them, but haven’t the foggiest idea about what they actually do? Great! Read on because although you’re certainly not alone, by the end of this post you’ll be able to happily cancel your subscription to the #HashtagNoIdeaclub (don’t be offended - I just made that up). Read on - it’s super-simple, promise.

What are hashtags?

They’re little search tools that help you find your tribe and help your tribe find you. That’s because a hashtags act as a kind of category label that people use to group their posts under certain themes or categories that other people are using to find stuff.

In other words, it's simply a way for people to find content and have their content found. A way of organising & categorising in an attempt to match what people are looking for with content that's relevant.

So on this blog post, I could use #hashtag (and I have), so that it'll show up when someone searches the hashtag #hashtag. It’s a way for someone to find content that’s specifically relevant to what they’re looking for, and a way for me to show up in those searches. In other words, by incorporating #hashtag in my post, I’m indicating that this content is relevant to hashtags and will show up in a search on that. See what I mean? Easy!

Although I’m sure you already get this bit, you create a hashtag by adding the # sign to the front of a word or a phrase. Please know however, that hashtags don’t contain spaces or special characters. So if it’s a phrase like #hashtagninja, placing a space between ‘hashtag’ & ‘ninja’ would create the hashtag #hashtag without the ‘ninja’ bit. Probably stating the obvious, but still …

And, although you can’t use special characters, you can use capitals. Using capitals can be a good way to make a phrase hashtag easier to read, for example, #HashtagNoIdeaClub … and this is not you, so don’t worry about that one.

How do they work?

I’ve pretty much covered that in the ‘what’ paragraph, but basically it’s a way of applying a label or keyword category to a piece of content (any content) as a way to be found in searches. Tapping on or clicking on a hashtagged word in a post or message, will show you other posts, Tweets, messages and content that includes that hashtag.

Hashtags operate in much the same way on all platforms, although they’ll be more useful on some depending on the ‘culture’ of that platform or network. For example, although hashtags started as a Twitter thing, Instagram is the network whose users utilise them the most. And, while you can use hashtags on Facebook, they haven’t really taken off on that platform, so results may be scanty. It’s worth having a snoop though - you never know what you’ll find.

Why should I use hashtags?

Depending on which platforms you’re most active on, and where you’re at in growing your business, there may be some good reasons to use hashtags. If you’re primarily on Facebook, then you can do a bit of research and see if it’s worth incorporating a few that are super-relevant to your industry or niche. Same with Twitter. You won’t need many (up to 3), just really relevant ones that serve the purpose of you being found in that category.

If you’re on Instagram, then you’ll most probably want to give bit of strategy to this and get your hashtags sorted. Instagram is a hashtaggy platform and using them makes a real difference to finding people and being found - this is critical if you’re trying to grow your following.

Instagram allows up to 30 hashtags in a single post and if you’re just starting out, or trying to grow your following, I would recommend using all 30. It’s a completely acceptable practice on Instagram and if you put your hashtags in the first comment, rather than the description of your post, you preserve the message you want to share without risking readers being side-tracked by hashtags, or appearing unnatural and spammy.

Go to one of Pepper Street Social’s Instagram posts (click here, or click on the Instagram icon anywhere on the PSS site), and you’ll see what I mean. I use all 30 allowed hashtags, but I put them in the comments section so they don’t interfere with my message.

 

How do I know which hashtags to use?

Do some simple research.

All you need to do is click on the search icon in Instagram, or Twitter, or Facebook, and type in the hashtag you’re interested in - see what comes up.

A good starting point is to find someone in your industry or niche and see what hashtags they’re using. Make a note of them and go search those hashtags.

In Instagram, when you go to ‘Search’ (on mobile), you can select the type of search you want to conduct i.e. you’ll see the options ‘Top’, ‘People’, Tags’ & ‘Places’.

If you click on ‘Tags’, and type a #hashtag in, Instagram will show you how many posts are using this tag. Cool hey. So after you’ve found some tags that are relevant to your business, pop them in the search to find out how popular they are - the more posts that hashtag appears in, the more people are using it and searching it, which means your reach is greater. See?

Yikes! This has gone a bit longer than I’m aiming for at the moment - I know you’re too busy to read massively long blog posts, so I apologise for that, but I do hope this one’s been particularly useful.


Go muck around with hashtags and if you’re on Instagram, use them well and you’ll see a difference in your engagement - it actually works. And if you need a hand with this stuff, send me a message (andrea@pepperstreetsocial.com, fill in the contact form below, or on my 'Work' page) - I’m about to release a brand new package where you can work with me for a month getting Instagram sorted and seeing results. It’s personally tailored coaching, but you do the work, so it’s super-affordable and an excellent investment … even if I do say so myself ;-)