Content without action, what is it?

We all get caught up in the social media buzz for business to be in front of your audience, to produce quality content, to be consistent, grow your brand, right? And it’s all good, all true, but with all that focus on content and exposure and engagement, it can be easy to lose sight of the next step. Not your next step, your customers’ next step.

That next step is all about the ‘call to action’. In other words, what do you want them to do next? Now that they’ve seen that awesome graphic, read that excellent caption, liked and shared that brilliant blog post … now what?

Here’s the thing; the people that like what you’re doing, have taken the time to follow you and read what you’ve written, have clicked ‘Like’ or double-tapped to show their support, they’re often ready and primed to do more. They just need you to tell them what that ‘more’ is.

Sometimes it’s a call to action (‘CTA’, in case you’ve read that elsewhere and wondered what it stood for ;) that addresses interest that’s early on in the piece and therefore asks for a super-simple action. On Instagram, ‘Double-tap if you like this’, or ‘agree with this’, or on Facebook, ‘Hit Like if you agree’, or ‘How about sharing this with your friends if you think they’d agree’.

It sounds so incredibly simple that we could easily dismiss this, right? But don’t mistake simplicity for ineffective. I admittedly sometimes underrate the worth of this wisdom too, and yet when I’m scrolling through my feeds and I see a request for me to ‘Double-tap if you agree’, or something similar, I always feel compelled to do so … IF I agree. And often, when I see this request on posts I would ‘double-tap’ or ‘Like’ anyway, funnily enough, I feel compelled to then embellish that ‘like’ with a comment. Am I alone here? I don’t think so.

Then there are calls to action that address interest that’s further along and ask for a little more commitment, not much though. Something like, ‘Comment below’, and sharing with friends can take a moment more than simply ‘liking’, but if people are finding value in what you’re doing, then it’s really no big deal.

The thing about asking for comments and shares as your calls to action is that people like to be helpful and they like to share the knowledge they have as a way of being useful to others. It’s a fundamentally human trait and one of the basic reasons that social media has embedded itself so quickly in our lives. We like to help others and we like to use our knowledge to help others, so commenting and sharing facilitates this need pretty easily and pretty intuitively. Oh and you get engagement and exposure. Win - win.

More complicated calls to action meet our audience further down the line, where they’re ready to take more action and commit further. Therefore, these actions require more structure and planning on our behalf. Calls such as ‘Sign up to our newsletter’, or ‘Learn more’, or ‘Get your free …’ obviously require some additional set-up on our side so that our customers’ impetus goes somewhere. But I’m sure you can see that this how your content really becomes a tool for lead generation and sales in your business, and much more than a ‘nice to have’.

Content is lovely, content is enjoyable and engaging, but to make it worth the effort, make sure you tell your audience what you want them to do next. Social media is just a hobby unless it’s driving business objectives, so make sure your content is contributing to meeting those objectives by simply asking your audience to do what you want them to do next.

And here’s my call to action for you ... If you’ve read this blog post and you thought it contained some small value, how about commenting below to let me know you were here? And if you’re super-keen, would you mind sharing it with a friend? Plus, if you want a hand with setting up the other bits so you can call your audience to even more action, email me at andrea@pepperstreetsocial.com, or contact me via the form on my Work page … or just hit one of the social icons and connect with me that way.

 

Thanks for reading,

Andrea